Gobble.Gobble. The 5 Things I’m Most Grateful For This Year.

I could have said 10. I feel like 5 was just the right amount though.

Every year I write a blog about diabetes and Thanksgiving, or so it seems. I feel like we all do. We talk about diet and eating, bolusing and carbohydrate counting. I’ve written about the things that Diabetes has given me years ago but I’ve never written about the things I’m grateful for because I have diabetes.

So here we go.

1. I’m grateful that people want to know my story. 

In the past few years, including this year, I’ve had people ask me for an interview because of my advocacy and activism online. I’ve been featured in Sanofi’s Discuss Diabetes blog and most recently, I’ve been on La Bloga as a featured interview. I find it extremely interesting that because of my blogs like this or tweets that I put out there for the world to see, I’m contacted. On one hand, I want to tell stories that aren’t normally told (in my case, the Diabetes-Latina-Female version of things) but I also don’t want to be the only one and at times am sad that it seems that I am.

2. I’m grateful that I have a great job with health benefits.

When the world spends $245 billion on diabetes, you have to wonder if there’s anyone helping the world out. At times, I battle this only because when I didn’t have health insurance, I was getting by. However, now that everyone MUST have health insurance, I’m glad I’m getting it through my job and not having to pay for it on my own. There is something sacred about this whole health insurance thing. We are grateful to have it, yet it’s the epitome of capitalism-at-work. We still put so much into having insurance that at times I wonder if the pay out is what I get out of it. I still have to pay when I go see the doctor because well, since it’s up to the hospital, they over extend their value. I went to a specialist recently and hey, I have insurance, I pay a $40 co-pay to see you and she quite literally walked in, spoke for about 15 seconds and left her interns or residents to do the rest. No asking how I am or how I’m feeling– she just told me her recommendation and that was it.

I still have to pay out of pocket for things like pump supplies, insulin, strips– I have to pay over $100 for both of those together. Why? If you have insurance, your prices go up. If you don’t, they’re cheaper. How much sense does that make? Regardless, I’m grateful that if anything should happen, I’m covered. Hopefully.

1496676_10104335075356050_7380396918683718610_n3. I’m grateful for all the people who have supported me through pictures, questions, chats and talks. 

World Diabetes Day 14 was the best. I was all in blue and got my friends and family members to wear blue, too and send me a picture in support and awareness for Diabetes. I was so humbled to see people actually do this for me and those they love. It’s not just about helping to cure those who are ill but it’s about helping to educate those who need the education.

All of my friends and family pictured here, knows what it means to me to have their support. They’ve been with me in the hard times, have read my blogs, supported me in my efforts, asked me questions and pushed me to be the best advocate I can be. They make my work within this space, my awareness-building worth it.

To these incredible people, I say THANK YOU!

4. I’m grateful that I live in a world class city. 

Chicago is known for so many things, including its hospitals, doctors, research and resources. This ties in to having insurance– because of insurance, I’m able to take advantage of all of these things in order to take care of myself and to make sure I’m in good health. Chicago has my heart as my birthplace, my city, my representation of what home is. I don’t ever want to leave, but it’s also because I don’t have to. I hear from other people about the challenges they face in finding doctors, where here in Chicago, I’ve seen one who’s world-renowned, and the other who is one of the best in the region. Researchers, studies, the forefront of medicine and what can be possible– it’s all right here. I’m lucky to have it.

5. I’m grateful for my parents. 

Whether they were afraid to let me go to college or move out of the house, they never stopped me from doing anything. My parents, as a team, taught me how to take care of myself and trusted me to take care of myself when it came time. My mother never sat on me about my A1c after I was 18 years old. Instead I told her about my visits to the doctor and how I planned to make it all better by myself. My dad would charge me with sports and exercise, being my coach in order to get my blood sugar down as I was growing up. Now I tell him about the technology and the numbers and how I see things changing and improving in my health. They have always been my support, have been there to hear me vent, have made it possible for me to take care of myself and definitely set me on the right path. I’m always grateful for my parents, but in this sense, I couldn’t have asked for a better team to handle this life changing disease.

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Filed under Culture, Diabetes, Health

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